Stick-On Vents Are A Gateway Drug

It always starts out innocently enough. You're standing in your driveway, washing your Kia with the garden hose, when you suddenly notice the portholes on the hood of your neighbour's new Buick.

"Hey, those look sort of cool," you mistakenly think to yourself. So you drive on down to the local auto parts store, buy a set of "Universal Stick On Chrome Air Vents," and slap them on your front fenders (but upside-down, obviously).

It gives you a rush—ohhh, you love it. So you buy another set, for your C-pillars (cars need vents there, right?). Then you buy some more. Soon the amount of cheap plasti-chrome covering the surface area of your car can be measured in double-digit percentages.

Next thing you know you're doing unspeakable things to a Corvette in a dark alley so you can afford a Continental kit for your Chrysler 300.

(Because you are now convinced your 300 needs a Continental kit.)

Stick-On Vents Are A Gateway Drug

What's it look like when you hit rock-bottom? Ask the owners of the cars in our "You Can But You Shouldn't" gallery. It happened to them—we've got the pictures to prove it.

But don't let it happen to you. Avoid the urge to buy that stick-on chrome vent. It's just a gateway drug, man. And trust us, this is one rabbit hole you don't want to fall down.